Materials

Steelcase bringing more color, choice to office chairs

Steelcase bringing more color, choice to office chairs

The chair has a glass-filled nylon frame with upper back support provided by what Steelcase calls a "flexor": horizontal plastic ribs tucked behind the knit backrest. A separate plastic panel provides lumbar support. Along with a choice of two frame colors, Steelcase is offering 11 different colors of knit and flexor/lumbar plastics so buyers can mix and match to fit their personal style.

Suzanne Tick Ventures Into Glass for Skyline Collection

Suzanne Tick Ventures Into Glass for Skyline Collection

Architecture is an endless source of inspiration for textile designer Suzanne Tick, and she has brought that sensibility to a number of her projects, be they flooring for Tarkett or upholstery for Luum Textiles. “I go by every building skeleton and take a picture, and think, ‘That’s going to be the next weave structure,’” she says.

This 3D-Knit Chair Is Made From A Single Piece Of Technical Fabric

This 3D-Knit Chair Is Made From A Single Piece Of Technical Fabric

3D knitting isn’t just for clothes or shoes; it’s potentially the future of furniture. Even Ikea is getting into the game. This year, Layer–a design studio based in London–is releasing the “Tent” chair for the Italian brand Moroso. It’s a seamless, 3D-knitted chair that integrates upholstery, cushions, and an armrest into a single piece of fabric–riffing, as its name suggests, on tent design.

Effect of hardwood plywood duties remains uncertain

Effect of hardwood plywood duties remains uncertain

How any duties on Chinese-made hardwood and decorative plywood producers affect domestic residential furniture producers would depend to a large extent on how producers use those materials in their finished goods.

The case clearly does not affect finished goods coming in from China but rather panels that are imported from China and used in the assembly of kitchen cabinets and some furniture still made in the U.S.

This includes hardwood and decorative plywood and certain veneered panels, which are described as a “generally flat, multilayered plywood panel or other veneered panel that consists of two or more layers of wood veneers and a core.” The core of the hardwood and decorative plywood consists of layers of one or more materials that are between the face and back veneers.

Via furnituretoday.com 

Antimicrobial Products Are The Worst

Antimicrobial Products Are The Worst

Earlier this week, the World Health Organization issued a warning that superbugs—drug-resistant bacteria and pathogens—are one of the most dangerous and imminent threats to people. The cause? Overuse and abuse of antibiotics and antimicrobials. Bacteria and germs make us sick, so the prevailing practice has been to kill them—but that's only making us more vulnerable to superbugs. Now, the design industry is chiming in about how buildings contribute to the problem and what can be done about it.

Via fastcodesign.com

White Paper: Antimicrobial Building Products Should Be Avoided Whenever Possible

White Paper: Antimicrobial Building Products Should Be Avoided Whenever Possible

Antimicrobial building products marketed as “healthy” or beneficial to human health contain ingredients that may have adverse environmental or human health impacts, and alternative products should be considered whenever possible, according to a new white paper by global architecture and design firm Perkins+Will and the Healthy Building Network (HBN).

Healthy Environments: Understanding Antimicrobial Ingredients in Building Materials exposes the lack of scientific evidence supporting claims that so-called antimicrobial products like paints, kitchen countertops, door handles, flooring, and other interior finishes help ward off communicable diseases. In fact, the report highlights a growing body of research suggesting potential negative impacts of antimicrobials on both the body and the environment. Potential impacts include the possible proliferation of “super bugs” caused by microbial resistance, contamination of aquatic ecosystems, and potential exposure to known or suspected carcinogens like formaldehyde.

Click here to read the full white paper.