How Hospitality Design Makes Spaces (Of All Types) Better for Users

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Across every market, be it healthcare, education or business, people are understanding design in much more sophisticated ways. Fueled by growing consumerism and shifting generational preferences, people expect better experiences at the hospital, in a college student union and/or in the workplace. They expect immersive experiences that make their lives more enjoyable.

Responding to these shifting expectations, building owners and design teams working in other markets now regularly embrace leading ideas from the world of hospitality and infuse them into their projects. Borrowing these ideas allow organizations to push new boundaries, achieve competitive differentiation, and/or bolster recruitment and retention.

Why Hospitality Design?
The hospitality market has long been delivering valuable immersive experiences for customers and that makes it rich for cross-market ideas and engagement. Whether it’s the warm welcome of the Maitre D at a fine restaurant or the elegant touches at a grand hotel, these efforts and moments positively impact the human experience and can make all the difference for guests. Today’s generation values experience more than its predecessors and is often willing to pay for it. This means hospitality design will have more opportunities and more impact informing projects in other markets moving forward. We should be designing to create memorable impressions, conscientious touch points for users, in as many places as possible and ensuring equity across all cultures and economic boundaries who experience those spaces.

Where can hospitality design have the most value?
There are so many ways hospitality design can influence other markets, consider the following:

HEALTHCARE
Healthcare is a challenging field for those who work in it. Long hours and constant stress are ever-present realities for employees resulting in burnout and turnover. While healthcare organizations spend a great deal of time and investment on creating incredible patient experiences, they should turn to hospitality to elevate staff experiences. Just as hotels provide areas of respite for guests or public spaces connect visitors to nature – healthcare spaces should strive to do the same. UC San Diego Health’s Jacobs Medical Center is a positive example of this as it infuses numerous elevated gardens and terraces along with public art where staff can pause for rejuvenation during the day. The building’s curvilinear form also promotes natural movement and ensures maximum daylighting for both staff and patients.