Yannick Binvel: What the future of the workplace will look like

Yannick Binvel: What the future of the workplace will look like

From Artificial Intelligence (AI) to a new generation joining the workforce, the workplace is gearing up for change. We spoke with Yannick Binvel, president, global industrial markets, at organizational and people advisory firm Korn Ferry International Inc., to understand what these changes will mean. Global industrial markets is believed to be the largest industrial practice in the world, spanning nine sectors such as construction, agriculture and mining.

Via livemint.com

Could Working Remotely Be As Bad For Your Health As Smoking?

Could Working Remotely Be As Bad For Your Health As Smoking?

As people grow more isolated in their work, which comprises more than half of most people’s day, that is in many cases a missed opportunity to interact. Over time I think we will see negative effects of working remotely, working alone, working digitally, on people’s health.

Pantone Color of the Year: The Impact of Greenery

Pantone Color of the Year: The Impact of Greenery

Once a year, in a secret part of Europe, a group of elite color strategists, psychologists, and trend forecasters stare deep into a giant crystal ball and channel visions of the future. Well, half of that is true—the other half is a little more pragmatic. For that last 17 years, the Pantone Color Institute has presented to the world its Pantone Color of the Year. The group pays close attention to big picture demographics such as Hollywood films, fashion, technology, and popular travel destinations. Then they crunch thousands of data points down to one relevant color that sets the global tone for the entire following year. In its introduction to 2016’s color of the year, Rose Quartz and Serenity, Pantone stated “…as consumers seek mindfulness and wellbeing as an antidote to modern day stresses, welcoming colors that psychologically fulfill our yearning for reassurance and security are becoming more prominent.” As designers, we certainly saw these influences in our work as clients moved away from big pops of color in favor of more soothing palettes in the workplace.

Via interiorarchitects.com 

Why Build Green? Lowered Operational Costs, Increased Staff Productivity and Higher Asset Values

Why Build Green? Lowered Operational Costs, Increased Staff Productivity and Higher Asset Values

Green building continues to play a growing role in the construction industry, with building industry professionals forecasting that more than 60 percent of their projects will be “green” by 2018. 

Why build green? The survey found that green buildings offer significant operational cost savings compared with traditional buildings. Respondents — these include more than 1,000 survey participants from 69 countries — said they expect a 14 percent savings in operational costs over five-year savings for new green buildings and 13 percent savings in operational costs over five years for green retrofits and renovations.

Via environmentalleader.com 

GENSLER NEW YORK GIVES ITSELF A RED HOT REDESIGN

GENSLER NEW YORK GIVES ITSELF A RED HOT REDESIGN

When your offices are also a display of your abilities in design and architecture, you’ve got to bring your A game to the project. And that’s what the global architecture and design firm Gensler did when it moved and redesigned its New York offices. Spanning five floors of a Broadway address, Gensler New York glows red from the exterior and thrums with the same hot intensity inside. A striking central staircase anchors the offices, while surfaces — covered in slate bricks, warm woods, gleaming floors, and vivid pops of Gensler’s signature reds — wrap the workspace with a dramatic-yet-modern flair.

Via workdesign.com 

3 Reasons the Landlord Might Shut Down Your Open Office Plan

3 Reasons the Landlord Might Shut Down Your Open Office Plan

One of the biggest trends in business and real estate is the shift happening within office setup. In many companies, gone are private offices and cubicles, replaced by open concepts that can foster collaboration and create a more dynamic work environment. From a landlord’s perspective, however, a handful of challenges exist that could lead to their resistance to allowing such plans.

Via cresa.com 

The Design Hack That Makes for Friendlier Offices

The Design Hack That Makes for Friendlier Offices

It’s never a bad idea to find yourself some work pals — after all, research has shown that people learn more on the job when they have fun at the office — but actually making those connections between the hours of nine and five is often easier said than done. If your job requires you to spend the bulk of that time typing away in a cubicle, there’s not much opportunity for organic socializing; unless you happen to catch someone on line for the kitchen microwave around lunchtime, your options are kind of limited.

Via nymagazine.com 

Common Office Spaces Are Also Alluring to Clients

Common Office Spaces Are Also Alluring to Clients

The move toward decreasing barriers between a company’s employees and its clients reflects a broader shift toward designing spaces to create vibrant social places, as well as more choices in the types of places where employees can work, said Lenny Beaudoin, senior managing director and global workplace leader at real-estate services firm CBRE Group Inc.

Via wsj.com 

How The Affordable Care Act Is Transforming Health Care Design

How The Affordable Care Act Is Transforming Health Care Design

President Obama signed the Affordable Care Act seven years ago last week. Since then, providers have slowly changed their approach in a response to the law’s provisions, which emphasize a holistic approach to medicine, preventative measures, and bringing services to more people. It’s unclear if the ACA will endure, despite the high-profile failure of the Trump administration’s first major legislative action to repeal and replace the law. But some of its longer-term benefits are beginning to come into focus, as the first crop of hospitals and clinics to be built since the ACA’s approval are now coming on line.

Via fastcodesign.com

IBM, remote-work pioneer, is calling thousands of employees back to the office

IBM, remote-work pioneer, is calling thousands of employees back to the office

Less than a year into her tenure as IBM’s chief marketing officer, Michelle Peluso prepared to make an announcement that she knew would excite some of her 5,500 new employees, but also, inevitably, inspire resignation notices from others. She had already briefed managers and the leaders of small teams on the news, which had been set in motion before her arrival in September. The rumor mill had already informed most other employees. All that was left to do was to make it official. “It’s time for Act II: WINNING!” read the subject line of Peluso’s blog post on the company intranet.

Via qz.com 

6 Tips for Designing the Perfect Workspace

6 Tips for Designing the Perfect Workspace

These days, we demand everything from our workspaces: privacy, personality, hospitality, flexibility. We want sitting desks and standing desks, napping areas and play areas. We expect our workspaces to be all things at all times, such that we forget their essential purpose: for thoughtful, productive work. How do you create a workspace where actual work happens? These six tips will make any workspace feel perfectly yours and will ignite your most creative ideas.

Via entrepreneur.com 

Your Open-Space Office May Be Killing Productivity

Your Open-Space Office May Be Killing Productivity

About ten years ago, I shut down our offices. Everyone in my company works remotely from their home offices or at clients. The decision could not have been timed better. Besides saving on overhead, it seems that I avoided one of the worst office design trends ever embraced by corporate culture: the dreaded "open office."

Via inc.com 

Kvadrat textile factory revealed in photography by Alastair Philip Wiper

Kvadrat textile factory revealed in photography by Alastair Philip Wiper

These new images by British photographer Alastair Philip Wiper reveal one of the facilities where leading textile manufacturer Kvadrat produces its highly engineered fabrics. Wiper visited the Wooltex factory in Yorkshire, England, one of several specialist textile mills around Europe that Kvadrat has invested in. His aim was to show the complex process that goes into making its high-end products.

Read more on dezeen.com 

Luxury Buildings’ Latest Amenity: Co-Working Spaces

Luxury Buildings’ Latest Amenity: Co-Working Spaces

Changing American work habits and the growing popularity of co-working spaces like WeWork, Workhouse and the Farm continue to transform the office landscape. And residential developers have taken notice: A number of new residential projects feature shared work spaces that channel the vibe of trendy start-ups with computer bars, comfortable seating and coffee stations.

Via nytimes.com 

Will the Gig Economy Make the Office Obsolete?

Will the Gig Economy Make the Office Obsolete?

The gig economy, where independent consultants, contractors, and freelancers create portfolios of work in lieu of one full-time job, is transforming the way we work by disconnecting work from an office. In the traditional jobs economy, employers often require employee attendance in the office five days a week, eight hours a day. Gig economy employers, in contrast, focus entirely on performance, not attendance in the office. It doesn’t matter if the idea for how to solve a problem or the insight to craft a new strategy is generated in the middle of the night, or while showering, or in yoga class. The gig economy employer values the quality of worker results, not the process by which they are created.

Via hbr.org 

LISTEN: How Aristotle Created the Computer

LISTEN: How Aristotle Created the Computer

The history of computers is often told as a history of objects, from the abacus to the Babbage engine up through the code-breaking machines of World War II. In fact, it is better understood as a history of ideas, mainly ideas that emerged from mathematical logic, an obscure and cult-like discipline that first developed in the 19th century. Mathematical logic was pioneered by philosopher-mathematicians, most notably George Boole and Gottlob Frege, who were themselves inspired by Leibniz’s dream of a universal “concept language,” and the ancient logical system of Aristotle.

Via theatlantic.com

This Office Has a Bar -- But Staff Don't Go There Just to Drink

This Office Has a Bar -- But Staff Don't Go There Just to Drink

It’s 10 a.m. on a Wednesday at Diageo, one of the world’s largest producers of spirits (and owner of brands such as Johnnie Walker, Captain Morgan, Guinness and Smirnoff). Dozens of its 150 Manhattan-based employees are clustered around the office bar, adjacent to the entrance of the company’s 56,000-square-foot office. But they’re not here to drink -- even people who work for booze companies have their limits. (Alcohol is primarily served at night during events and employee happy hours.) Instead, by day, the bar becomes a casual meeting point.

Via entrepreneur.com